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With 20lb emptied out of Mike’s bags, we headed over to the post office to get it sent off. We tried to get it sent to the mainland, but thanks to a combination of mine and Mike’s Spanish we realised it wasn’t possible. Baja is considered a frontier state and so anything shipped to the mainland has to get inspected by a customs official. There was one 3 days down the road, but that didn’t help and so it got sent General Delivery to La Paz, our final destination in Baja.

Brunch was had in a Chinese restaurant that had no Chinese food on the menu and we were both excited about what lay ahead. The delay the day before had been frustrating, but it meant that Mike was better organised and carrying fewer unimportant things. Packing for your first trip is a challenge and it seems that no matter how many other blogs you read, and how little you think you’re carrying, you’ll realise when you hit that first big hill that you can’t work out why you thought you needed to carry a pair of jeans and that extra t-shirt.

The second attempt to ride was much more successful than 24 hours earlier. We had the fortune of the least undulating road that I’d seen in all of Mexico. Others complain about how it’s a dull stretch of the desert, but that was the perfect thing for Mike’s first day. It wasn’t quite Florida with the constant services, but even the wind joined in to make it a gentle start.

While Guerrero is a good 10c cooler than the rest of Baja Sur, and is often cloudy until mid-afternoon, it warmed up as we headed inland. By the time we made it to Vizcaino we’d had a good amount of sun and were happy to be done. I’d been teaching Mike to count and getting him practicing with any signs we saw. He’d done a good job, but was hurting a bit when we got into town. The idea of sleeping in a tent didn’t appeal to him in the slightest and we sought out an hotel and then went out for tacos from the street vendors as well as a beer or two to celebrate the success of day 1.

End of day 1

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