Older
Newer

We got up with plans to leave early, but then spent the morning hanging out with Hector and family. Although we were excited to get to Guanajuato (GTO), it was also really easy to spend the morning with them. When we eventually left, Hector’s gardener gave us a lift out of town to make up for some of the time we had lost to ensure we actually had some time in GTO.

The road was straight, flat and busy, but with the mountains that GTO is located in appearing it kept it interesting. Just before GTO, we turned off the main road and started the gentle climb into GTO. Like Zacatecas before, it is also a city built on silver mining and is thought of as one of the most beautiful cities in Mexico. Because of the hills it’s built on, it’s not the most accessible city, and getting in is slightly confusing. The ride in is made even more interesting with a series of tunnels that then get combined with the joys of cobbles to and random bus-stops in the middle of tunnels to make for an unforgettable experience. We didn’t know where we would be staying, and although there were plenty of people shouting at us trying to offer us hotels, we kept going until we got to the centre and found a random hostel near the cathedral.

After a quick clean up, we headed out with a goal in mind, to go to the Don Quixote museum. Pedro had been reading Don Quixote on and off for the whole time we’d been riding together, and had been hoping to finish it by the time we got to GTO. Unfortunately, the complete works of Sherlock Holmes got in the way and so he hadn’t been able to.

GTO proved to be a really pretty city and we had a lovely time wandering around. I’d been considering studying there, as the university offers a semester long Spanish programme that doesn’t cost much, but as it wouldn’t start for another 5 weeks the timing was off. The only way I’d have been able to take it would have been to keep travelling for a few weeks then hop on a bus back to GTO, but that didn’t really appeal and would mean another month of travelling in México with horrific Spanish.

Tunnels

Older
Newer