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Yelson has his own Shish bar and lives above it, meaning he is a 2-3 minute walk to the central square. Sucre isn’t big, even though it’s constitutionally still the capital, but I was very glad to be there and not in the outskirts. It definitely makes getting things done in a city much easier.

HJ had picked up a bike in Lima, Peru, and found her way down to Sucre to ride with me for a couple of weeks in Bolivia. She didn’t have any bags, and Bolivia really isn’t the place to buy bike stuff, but she had found a video on Youtube that explained how to convert backpacks to panniers. Not speaking much Spanish she took her laptop, and the materials to a shop, showed them to a guy and he said he’d make them for her for $25. A success! They wouldn’t be waterproof, but bin liners work in emergencies and anything really important could get put in my bags if there was the space.

Sucre has been a UNESCO city since 1991, and it’s down to the pretty white architecture. I’m pretty sure it’s illegal to build anything black, at least in the rather large central zone. There are a number of relaxing plazas and it’s definitely worth a visit if you’re after a colonial city. Having seen probably north of 100, I’m starting to get a little bored of them – maybe signalling that it could be time to leave the Americas?

We had been thinking of leaving on the Sunday morning, but sleeping above a bar meant that there was music until 4 or 5am – not great for waking up early to hit the road. Yelson didn’t have Internet at home, and so to find Wi-Fi we went to a hostel and drank a beer. Even there, the Internet was not so good and explains why I could get nothing more than my Asunción – Camiri blog post up.

View from WiFi hostel

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