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Having sat around in Uyuni for a couple of days, we decided what the plan was. I was giving up the idea of heading back to Argentina and up through Chile. Instead, it would be up through the Salars of Uyuni and Coipasa, up to La Paz and then… probably Cusco. I’m not convinced that that includes Machu Picchu, the cheapest way of doing it is $100-120 – way more than I’d want to spend, but that’s to decide later. The Salar de Uyuni is the world’s largest salt flat, HJ had already been there twice on jeep tours and I have to say that there’s possibly something to be said in a jeep tour across it. After the initial thoughts like “Wow I’m on a salt flat”, “It’s so big”, “All I can see is white!” it loses a bit of it’s appeal. If you read this post, it explains wonderfully.

For me, the highlight was as we were leaving Uyuni, we ran into Dave and Monica. They are two Kiwis from the website SongBike. We spoke for a while, but then rode at our own rhyhtm, safe in the knowledge that we’d meet up again at the end of the day. That’s because nearly all people that leave Uyuni end up, 100km later, at Isla Incahuasi, at an island in the middle of the salt flats where you can find not only water, but food and a place to sleep if you’re feeling rich. So it was, as the sun set that we arrived at Incahuasi and saw two cyclists arriving from the north at the same time – Dave and Monica.

The wind was pretty ridiculous, and the storms that we’d taken some evasive action during the day to avoid looked like they might be closing in. HJ had never put the tent up, and so instead of teaching her to help me put it up, she got to sit inside and stop it blowing away. Thankfully we managed to peg it down pretty well, that even though it rained during the night, we stayed dry. Safe, even though Big Agnes sent me non-matching body and fly for the tent so it doesn’t fit as it should.

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