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With only 35km to Sabaya, we were in no rush to get out, so it was time for a lie-in, staying in bed until almost 8am! Then it was back to the salt, for one final stretch across to solid ground. With the rails having failed again on my seat, the weld held but the other rail didn’t, it was more standing up to ride, which is fine for short periods of time but is nothing like as comfortable and puts stress on your knees and wrists that really doesn’t need to be there. Having said a glad final goodbye to the salt, it was dirt all the way to Sabaya. Some with horribly bouncy washboard, but thankfully the last stretch was easy and compact dirt.

Sabaya was like the other communities we had passed, seeming to be empty. In town there were three options to eat, chicken and chips, chicken and chips or the other place that sold chicken and chips. Being hungry, and with nothing else to chose from that was what I got. The next part of the plan, was to get ourselves to Oruro, 200km away, but there were no official buses after 1pm, and so we had to go to the main road to sit around and hope. There were 15 Bolivians with the same idea, so my plan of hitching a lift was impossible. Even though we were only about 40km away from Chile, traffic was almost non-existent. In the two hours we sat around, only 3 buses went past, one of them didn’t stop because he was full, and the other two only picked up 4 of the 15 people between them. There was little chance we were going to get to Oruro that night. We stayed in Sabaya, with the police, this time HJ doing the asking, and found that the town has a single police officer. He told us we could stay, but his shift ended at 6am the next day, and then he would be leaving so we had to be up and out of the station by then. No problem, we were asleep early, after I had chicken and chips again. I was looking forward to getting to Oruro, civilisation, shops with actual choices and a lunch option that was not chicken and chips!

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