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Immediately upon getting on the bike it was there again, the relentless beep of cars. They were free to drive again, and seemed to be trying to make up for the day before. Beeping at everyone, and no one. Even as we were riding outside of town, on our way back to the lakeside, every people carrier that went past beeped us. It might have been meant in kindness, a show of support, but it just made me wish that cars were banned.

We spent a fair chunk of the day riding along the lake. I’d read so many people say that it looks like an ocean, but considering you can nearly always see at least several little islands that seemed to be a bit of a stretch – a coastal ride along the sea maybe! Just after the town of Carabuco we met an English and Scottish cyclist who warned us about the road ahead. From what I gathered. the whole of the dirt road had giant rocks and was nigh on unrideable. That seemed to clash with what I’d heard about the majority of it, but I thanked them for the information. I didn’t get to chat with them much, as HJ had set off before me while I adjusted my seat – I’d not done the bolt up properly and it was slipping around – so they’d already been chatting for the best part of 10 minutes when I got to them. Knowing that they were closer to their goal than we were, we said our goodbyes.

It was similar later on, but even shorter, when just outside of Escoma, as we started on the dirt road – which was mainly compacted sand – we ran into a Canadian and a German. They were heading to Escoma, 2km away, but we were heading along the dirt and it was 20km to Puerto Acosta, our possible goal, with only 30 minutes of light left. They seemed very friendly, and if we’d chosen to have a shorter day, and stopped in Escoma instead, we could have chatted the night away. As it was, I apologised for having to leave and pushed on. The light failed well before we got to Puerto Acosta, and we got a couple of slow hours riding side-by-side so we could use my headlight to see.

It was around 9pm when we got to town. We’d gone past plenty of small communities on the way, and places where we definitely could have stayed for the night, but with energy still in our legs – mine at least – we pushed on. My cycling is one part of my life where I don’t procrastinate. Usually I decide I’ll study tomorrow, write the blog later, edit the photos in a bit, but with riding it’s all about ride today so I don’t have to do it tomorrow. Bizarre. It was a consecutive day over 100km, and when we stopped HJ stumbled as her legs tried to give up. Thankfully that was outside a small restaurant, that still had soup, and so we got to sit down for a while to recover. The policeman was rather unfriendly and tired as she was HJ decided that we should just stay at the lodging, which was $4 for the room, rather than spend more time trying to find a place for free.

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