Arriving in Peru

Arriving in Peru

We woke up to find that HJ had a puncture, but thankfully with a small bike shop nearby that was no problem – I wouldn’t have to repair it! While the bike was getting sorted out, we walked over to the immigration office to stamp out. The office is fairly new, and the 3 surly officers didn’t seem to want to make us feel welcome. They each fingered through every page of our passports, tried claiming there were problems, that HJ’s visa was wrong, and other bull so I started

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Riding into the night

Riding into the night

Immediately upon getting on the bike it was there again, the relentless beep of cars. They were free to drive again, and seemed to be trying to make up for the day before. Beeping at everyone, and no one. Even as we were riding outside of town, on our way back to the lakeside, every people carrier that went past beeped us. It might have been meant in kindness, a show of support, but it just made me wish that cars were banned.

We spent a fair chunk of the day riding along the lake. I’d read

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Making the most of the election

Making the most of the election

Most countries in Latin America seem to ban the sale of alcohol during elections. Bolivia does that too, but also goes one step further in almost completely banning the car. Voting is compulsory, and the ban on cars is apparently to stop people voting multiple times. Honestly, considering how obvious the election result – an Evo landslide – it wouldn’t matter in the slightest. When you vote, you are given a piece of paper, without that paper you aren’t allowed to use the

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La Paz – The world’s highest city

La Paz – The world’s highest city

To get to La Paz, it was another bus. The road is 200km just like the road to Oruro and so just as unappealing to ride, especially as there is nearly always a headwind and while they’re building a new road, the old road has a very narrow shoulder and plenty of traffic passing by on a remarkably straight road – no thanks. Our bus was meant to leave at 11:30, but at noon we were still waiting near the terminal waiting for more passengers. This didn’t bother me too much, but plenty

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Oruro aka mini Brazil

Oruro aka mini Brazil

We were up and out of the police station just after 6am, the police officer so eager to go home that he was asking us to take our bags outside and put them on our bikes there. The breakfast options were slightly more varied than lunch or dinner, as there were a few old ladies with tables and what turned out to be overpriced and badly tasting quinoa with a piece of llama that was basically all bone. A bus left at 5:30, and then the next one at 8am. I was insistent on taking the bus because I had

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