Goodbye salt

Goodbye salt

With only 35km to Sabaya, we were in no rush to get out, so it was time for a lie-in, staying in bed until almost 8am! Then it was back to the salt, for one final stretch across to solid ground. With the rails having failed again on my seat, the weld held but the other rail didn’t, it was more standing up to ride, which is fine for short periods of time but is nothing like as comfortable and puts stress on your knees and wrists that really doesn’t need to be there. Having said a glad

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Another Salar

Another Salar

From Llica it was time to cross to the next Salar, the Salar de Coipasa. While Salar de Uyuni had had plenty of jeeps on it, no traffic went past us on our way to the town of Coipasa, located on an island in the middle of the salt flat. To get there, we had some roads that were a fun mix of washboard and sand. I found myself pushing most of the time, mainly so HJ could kind of keep up. After 2 hours, we’d gone 10k, and were glad to find that the community of Challacollo was not completely

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More salt

More salt

The tent held up through the night of rain, and because of the cloud cover it wasn’t too frigid in the morning. In the winter it can get down to -20c, especially when the wind picks up, but as it was spring it was passable. We had exchanged stories with Dave & Monica the night before, especially about how wonderful Brazil is, and in the morning they told us that they were strongly considering heading changing their route to head that way instead of the Peruvian Andes. They were planning

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Onto the Salar

Onto the Salar

Having sat around in Uyuni for a couple of days, we decided what the plan was. I was giving up the idea of heading back to Argentina and up through Chile. Instead, it would be up through the Salars of Uyuni and Coipasa, up to La Paz and then… probably Cusco. I’m not convinced that that includes Machu Picchu, the cheapest way of doing it is $100-120 – way more than I’d want to spend, but that’s to decide later. The Salar de Uyuni is the world’s largest salt flat

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Down to Uyuni

Down to Uyuni

From Pulacayo it was a further 20-30 minute climb, which would have been impossible the night before, and then a long downhill to Uyuni. Unfortunately, there was some serious amount of gusting during the downhill into Uyuni and I was getting blown from one shoulder right across the right to the other. Thankfully, the lack of traffic from the previous days was still evident and there were no problems – other than my frustration.

HJ had been to Uyuni twice before, and both times stayed in the

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