Onto the Salar

Onto the Salar

Having sat around in Uyuni for a couple of days, we decided what the plan was. I was giving up the idea of heading back to Argentina and up through Chile. Instead, it would be up through the Salars of Uyuni and Coipasa, up to La Paz and then… probably Cusco. I’m not convinced that that includes Machu Picchu, the cheapest way of doing it is $100-120 – way more than I’d want to spend, but that’s to decide later. The Salar de Uyuni is the world’s largest salt flat,

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The one where I got food poisoning

The one where I got food poisoning

I’d pumped up my tube the night before but woke to find it flat. So glad I took the lift down, as it turned out that all my spare tubes did indeed have punctures and that would have driven me insane finding that out the night before as I’d have had to stop every few kilometres to try out another tube. I found the one bike shop in town and gave him 4 tubes to repair. Two of them had failed where a bike shop back in Brazil had repaired them, and one of them had far too many holes to

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Retracing Che’s footsteps

Retracing Che’s footsteps

Over breakfast with Chacho we talked more about life in Bolivia. The country is made up of various indigenous people, and in the southeast it is mainly the Guarani – like in Paraguay. He spoke a lot about the differences between the Guarani and the Quechua, who I would be meeting on the way through the mountains, and didn’t seem overly fond of them. He hires farmhands, but only Guarani, as he trusts them more. They get paid 50BOB (Bolivian Bolivianos), which is about 7USD, a day and

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Diamantina – Ouro Preto

Diamantina – Ouro Preto

370km, 9km of climbing, 9km of descending and far too much dirt road, the Estrada Real was a definite challenge. According to the official numbers, 46% of the time is climbing and 43% descending, leaving very little time for anything to be flat. The official documents also say “It’s not necessary to be an athlete to travel the Estrada Real, because the difficulty is not that high, but it is necessary to be in good shape and used to spending several hours in a row cycling, walking or riding

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Lençois – Guanambí

Lençois – Guanambí

Lençois – Andaraí

While in Lençois I’d been having some serious thinking time about the upcoming route. In South America the climate provides a few serious restrictions. One of those is not being too far south during the winter, both to avoid the cold and very short days. That means that it’s only really advisable to go to the end of South America (Patagonia) from November to March. The other, is that in the Andes, from Colombia down to Chile, the rainy season is October to

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