Acclimatising in Potosí

Acclimatising in Potosí

The plan after Potosí wasn’t certain. Well, we’d be going to Uyuni, but then there were a lot of options. Whatever we did, we’d be up at elevation for a good while longer and for that reason I decided to have a couple of days off in Potosí. It would be a great help in acclimatising, especially with one of the route options going up to 5000m.

HJ went on the mine tour to Cerro Rico, but I decided to save the money and skip that. I was more interested in making a stove. I wanted

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Getting ready in Sucre

Getting ready in Sucre

Yelson has his own Shish bar and lives above it, meaning he is a 2-3 minute walk to the central square. Sucre isn’t big, even though it’s constitutionally still the capital, but I was very glad to be there and not in the outskirts. It definitely makes getting things done in a city much easier.

HJ had picked up a bike in Lima, Peru, and found her way down to Sucre to ride with me for a couple of weeks in Bolivia. She didn’t have any bags, and Bolivia really isn’t the place

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Alberdi and Asunción

Alberdi and Asunción

Thankfully the hard work of getting to Alberdi paid off as Julie proved a great hostess, showing me around and introducing me to plenty of people. She’s been in Alberdi for almost a year and so has a bit of a firmer idea of what she’s doing than Nora. She had made lots of amazing connections, and I was shown around to lots of them and got to hear about life in what somehow feels a little less isolated when you’re actually there, just because of it’s access across the river

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Back to Posadas

Back to Posadas

My 180 days in Brazil expired on the Friday and so we were forced to leave, there was also the small issue of making it back down to Posadas for Gaz’s bus on the Tuesday. We’d originally been planning to go to Asunción, but it ended up being better for both of us to head back to Posadas. For Gaz, it meant a shorter and cheaper bus ride back down to Buenos Aires. For me, it gave me the chance to get something sorted out with a parcel that I’ll explain later.

We had just over 300km to go,

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Foz do Iguaçu

Foz do Iguaçu

There are three main things to see in Foz do Iguaçu, the falls from the Brazilian side, the falls from the Argentinian side and Itaipu dam. As we’d crossed over around lunchtime, we rode up to Itaipu to see the dam. It’s the second largest in the world, and produces 75% of Paraguay’s needs and 17% of Brazil’s. They used to have a free bus tour, but that was scrapped a few years ago. Now that bus tour is $10 and the special tour is $30. Both of those were out of my price

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